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Stick insects

Stick insects

Postby Bushviper » Tue Jan 20, 2009 6:33 pm

I have kept a few tarantulas and scorpions for a while but recently I got something I did not think would fit in with my collection.

Image

These have turned out to be so easy to keep. They feed on rose leaves, mulberry leaves and Bluegum leaves.

I think that within a few years these will replace silkworms on the school playgrounds.
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Re: Stick insects

Postby BushSnake » Tue Jan 20, 2009 6:56 pm

Mass breed them and help thin out bluegum plantations....(and don't get caught)
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Re: Stick insects

Postby Bushviper » Tue Jan 20, 2009 7:22 pm

If they are only eating blue gums then wouldnt that class as biological control?
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Re: Stick insects

Postby BushSnake » Tue Jan 20, 2009 7:39 pm

Possible, but chances are good that they will move off to something indigenous. Many insects will change foodplant if pushed to the limit.
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Re: Stick insects

Postby Chameleons » Tue Jan 20, 2009 9:45 pm

You're right that they will move onto something else. We only use bluegum here because it is so easily available but in Europe they use all sorts of trees and bushes, including fruit trees, bramble etc. It wouldn't take long for these stick insects to find some rare indigenous plant to munch on. But cutting down large swathes of bluegum to feed them on in captivity - now that sounds like a good, ecologically friendly thing to do.

I cut most of my food along Main Road near Lonehill. I can safely leave my car as I wander, cutters in hand, as there are always policemen (or women) carefully secreted behind the trees with speed cameras nabbing motorists along Main Road.

If you want more info on stick insects, there are some care sheets on our web site: http://www.sa-chameleons.com. If all goes well, we hope to have some different species on display at the upcoming Reptile Show.
See photos of Malaysian insects on my Facebook page: Exotic Insects
Breeding Insects as feeder food by David Haggett now available from Amazon
Exotic Chameleons in South Africa, care and breeding by David Haggett also available from Amazon
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Re: Stick insects

Postby Bushviper » Wed Jan 21, 2009 10:04 am

Chameleons I never harvest plant matter near any roads. A friend of mine who is a well known bird vet harvested berries from plants on the highway and within a day he had killed off all the birds that ate them. It seems like the lead or other heavy metals get absorbed in the leaves and this accumulates and then kills the birds. In the wild the birds know this and you never see them eating next to busy roads.

Even if I get blue gum branches for my Cockatoo I pick trees far from the road just to be sure.

Why do you feel safe with women hiding behind the trees you are visiting? I would be more nervous.
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Re: Stick insects

Postby Chameleons » Wed Jan 21, 2009 10:20 am

That's a valid point but the bluegum leaves I collect are set off the road several metres among other bushes and I haven't had any trouble in two years. Possibly Main Road doesn't have the volume of heavy lorries, etc that travel the Highways? I tend to go for fairly new growth as well, although the bigger stick insects need older leaves.

The police seem too intent of their speed trap to be worried about me and I always hope that any potential hijackers would be too concerned about the proximity of the cops to take the risk. Shouting a greeting at the cops as I park near their 'hidden' van seems to confuse them slightly, though.
See photos of Malaysian insects on my Facebook page: Exotic Insects
Breeding Insects as feeder food by David Haggett now available from Amazon
Exotic Chameleons in South Africa, care and breeding by David Haggett also available from Amazon
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Re: Stick insects

Postby Liandre » Thu Aug 15, 2013 1:28 pm

Good day all,

I live in Kempton Park and would like to purchase two of these wonderfull insects.

where can I purchace them? near by.

Liandre
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Re: Stick insects

Postby Chameleons » Thu Aug 15, 2013 2:04 pm

I am sorry but I no longer live in SA, so I don't know who still has them locally. If you are interested I have other species of stick insects that I am breeding in Malaysia - leaf Insects, Phoebaticus serratipes, Lonchodes brevippes etc. You can have a look at photos on my Facebook page : Exotic Insects (also linked to Fantastic Insects).
See photos of Malaysian insects on my Facebook page: Exotic Insects
Breeding Insects as feeder food by David Haggett now available from Amazon
Exotic Chameleons in South Africa, care and breeding by David Haggett also available from Amazon
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