Northern Cape Herping

Re: Northern Cape Herping

Postby Bushviper » Mon May 31, 2010 3:02 pm

That is really good news. I am sure with some seeds blowing onto the barren soil and just a bit of rain the area will look the same as what it did 100 years ago. I am assuming they have not used toxic chemicals during the mineral extraction process.

I would love to know how soon the reptiles will colonize it after it has been flattened. Once the vegetation grows the insects will arrive and then the lizards and then the snakes.
It is easier to ask for forgiveness than permission.

Those who are afraid to ask are ashamed of learning.
User avatar
Bushviper
Founder Member
 
Posts: 17358
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2005 10:02 am
Location: Pretoria

Re: Northern Cape Herping

Postby Westley Price » Mon May 31, 2010 3:10 pm

There are areas which were flattened a few years back (maybe 5 years or so) and first the wind blown dune sand returns. Then De Beers have contractors which harvest seeds and plant these seeds in barren areas. They put up nets perpendicular to the wind direction to keep the sand and seeds relatively stable for the seeds to germinate. Once that happens the area looks natural within months.

The areas which were rehabilitated 5 years back look pretty close to normal now and lacertids have already returned. Probably also snakes although I have not yet seen any in that particular spot.
"I am dying by inches from not having anybody to talk to about insects." - Charles Darwin
User avatar
Westley Price
Forum gatekeeper
 
Posts: 4017
Joined: Tue Feb 12, 2008 8:25 am
Location: South Africa

Re: Northern Cape Herping

Postby BushSnake » Mon May 31, 2010 8:22 pm

Nice reptiles. BTW - I think that first gecko is actually Goggia rupicola and not G.lineata :)
And I thought Phelsuma looked different to Lygodactylus, but apparently they are just the same little dull gecko!

I wonder how successfull those rehab programs really are? The ones on the KZN coast are reportedly successfull, although they have never found any of the endangered species returning without assistance to the "new" habitat. I'm really interested in a proper report cause I know that the info I get is either distorted by the bunny huggers, or twisted by the developers...
We must remember that a photograph can hold just as much as we put into it, and no one has ever approached the full possibilities of the medium - Ansel Adams
User avatar
BushSnake
SA Reptiles Honorary Member
 
Posts: 1678
Joined: Tue Jul 17, 2007 5:18 pm
Location: Johannesburg... and all over SA

Re: Northern Cape Herping

Postby Westley Price » Tue Jun 01, 2010 8:19 am

You academics always think you know better ;)

G. lineata occurs in predominantly two pattern forms: the striped form we all know and then this scallop-patterned form.

It very much resembles G. rupicola but without the orange tail and very prominent stripe running through the eye.

I'm sure there are more subtle differences, but I cannot name them off my head.

If this is G. rupicola then this record will create a large range extension as this was found about 2km from the coast and from distribution maps G. rupicola occu quite far inland.

BS, feel free to forward the image to get a positive ID.
"I am dying by inches from not having anybody to talk to about insects." - Charles Darwin
User avatar
Westley Price
Forum gatekeeper
 
Posts: 4017
Joined: Tue Feb 12, 2008 8:25 am
Location: South Africa

Re: Northern Cape Herping

Postby BushSnake » Tue Jun 01, 2010 7:27 pm

Us academics? Since when has anyone listened to the opinions of engineers? Your car would actually run off hydrogen and not off petrol if they did listen to us :D

I've never actually heard of the other form, and have found quite a number of typical striped forms but on in the inland areas around Springbok and Kamieskroon. But I'll investigate, and I'll send the photo on for a second opinion. But don't worry, I actually believe you. After all, its the word of a Northern Cape herpetologist against that of a "stadsjapie"... ;)
We must remember that a photograph can hold just as much as we put into it, and no one has ever approached the full possibilities of the medium - Ansel Adams
User avatar
BushSnake
SA Reptiles Honorary Member
 
Posts: 1678
Joined: Tue Jul 17, 2007 5:18 pm
Location: Johannesburg... and all over SA

Re: Northern Cape Herping

Postby Westley Price » Wed Jun 02, 2010 7:43 am

Haha, since when have engineers listened to geologists?

I check in my field guide and I have to rephrase myself. They aren't two different forms/phases, but the pattern is just so varied that you get everything from the typical striped variety to the scalloped variety and everything in between.

Please do send the pic on for positive ID. I'd appreciate it.

Thanks

Edited BS
"I am dying by inches from not having anybody to talk to about insects." - Charles Darwin
User avatar
Westley Price
Forum gatekeeper
 
Posts: 4017
Joined: Tue Feb 12, 2008 8:25 am
Location: South Africa

Re: Northern Cape Herping

Postby BushSnake » Wed Jun 02, 2010 5:26 pm

Please send me the coordinates or a good description of where and I'll get it away hopefully by early next week.
We must remember that a photograph can hold just as much as we put into it, and no one has ever approached the full possibilities of the medium - Ansel Adams
User avatar
BushSnake
SA Reptiles Honorary Member
 
Posts: 1678
Joined: Tue Jul 17, 2007 5:18 pm
Location: Johannesburg... and all over SA

Re: Northern Cape Herping

Postby Westley Price » Mon Jun 07, 2010 8:24 am

Bad news guys. This will be my last post on this thread as an Aggeneys civilian. I am being relocated to supposed greener pastures.

I will come back to this side maybe once a year so the topic is far from dead, but posts will be few and far between.

A last little addition before I bow down.

Nucras tessellata

Image

Image

Image
"I am dying by inches from not having anybody to talk to about insects." - Charles Darwin
User avatar
Westley Price
Forum gatekeeper
 
Posts: 4017
Joined: Tue Feb 12, 2008 8:25 am
Location: South Africa

Re: Northern Cape Herping

Postby Mitton » Mon Jun 07, 2010 8:45 am

Nice pics.
Hopefully soon you can start a new thread with even better finds from a new area.
www.moreliapythons.co.za
User avatar
Mitton
Forum gatekeeper
 
Posts: 3206
Joined: Mon Dec 04, 2006 12:32 pm
Location: Jhb

Re: Northern Cape Herping

Postby Pythonodipsas » Mon Jun 07, 2010 8:50 am

I almost feel sad. haha. Nice Nucras Westley.
`
If you wanna find out what's behind these cold eyes, you'll just have to claw your way through this disguise.
Roger Waters & David Gilmour - 1979
User avatar
Pythonodipsas
SAReptiles Techie
 
Posts: 3166
Joined: Sun Jul 31, 2005 1:32 pm
Location: Ramsgate, KZN

Re: Northern Cape Herping

Postby Bushviper » Mon Jun 07, 2010 9:03 am

The worst is we will know these herps are still out there in perfect poses and nobody to take their pictures and share them.

Good luck with your new places although I doubt it will be anything as exciting.
It is easier to ask for forgiveness than permission.

Those who are afraid to ask are ashamed of learning.
User avatar
Bushviper
Founder Member
 
Posts: 17358
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2005 10:02 am
Location: Pretoria

Re: Northern Cape Herping

Postby Durban Keeper » Mon Jun 07, 2010 4:30 pm

Amazing shots as always.
Life is but a dream for the dead.
User avatar
Durban Keeper
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 2284
Joined: Tue Jun 17, 2008 9:14 pm
Location: Durban

Re: Northern Cape Herping

Postby nvlooi » Mon Jun 07, 2010 8:42 pm

Thanks for the amazing contribution of pics of a world herpers dream of.
I hope your new location and job will be as exciting as this one was.

Henco
Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure... - Nelson Mandela

Henco
User avatar
nvlooi
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 1121
Joined: Mon Mar 09, 2009 2:11 am
Location: Paarl, Western Cape

Re: Northern Cape Herping

Postby froot » Tue Jun 08, 2010 9:09 am

Let's see if you can accomplish a 18 page topic on Gauteng herps :-P

Thanks for your contributions Wes.
We salute the improvement of the human genome by honoring those who remove themselves from it.
Of necessity, this honor is generally bestowed posthumously. - www.darwinawards.com
User avatar
froot
Founder Member
 
Posts: 6901
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2005 8:19 am
Location: Joburg, South Africa

Re: Northern Cape Herping

Postby Westley Price » Wed Jun 09, 2010 6:49 am

Thanx for the kind comments all.

Froot, I hope that's not a dare?
"I am dying by inches from not having anybody to talk to about insects." - Charles Darwin
User avatar
Westley Price
Forum gatekeeper
 
Posts: 4017
Joined: Tue Feb 12, 2008 8:25 am
Location: South Africa

PreviousNext

Return to Northern Cape

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron