Black Tree Snake not a Boomslang!

Snakes exotic to South Africa with venoms that are considered to be medically important.

View Gallery

Re: Black Tree Snake not a Boomslang!

Postby armata » Mon Jun 08, 2009 6:52 pm

The juveniles I found in W.Kenya were not heavily marked like that, only the edge of the scales were black; also the eye was totally black, strange.
' I get my kicks on Route 62 '
User avatar
armata
SA Reptiles Honorary Member
 
Posts: 2986
Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2007 2:19 pm
Location: Oudtshoorn, Western Cape

Re: Black Tree Snake not a Boomslang!

Postby s'mee » Mon Jun 08, 2009 7:51 pm

Individual or regional variation perhaps?
This one was from the Western side of the continent, I have no personal experience with those from Eastern side.
If ignorance is bliss, there must be a lot of happy people out there...
s'mee
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 119
Joined: Fri Aug 17, 2007 4:03 pm
Location: Somewhere out there

Re: Black Tree Snake not a Boomslang!

Postby armata » Mon Jun 08, 2009 8:15 pm

Regional variation yes, but the eye should be a constant.
' I get my kicks on Route 62 '
User avatar
armata
SA Reptiles Honorary Member
 
Posts: 2986
Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2007 2:19 pm
Location: Oudtshoorn, Western Cape

Re: Black Tree Snake not a Boomslang!

Postby Rob » Mon Jun 15, 2009 1:43 pm

So small and already puffing the neck. Gotta cut that out when they still young :)

Thanks smee
Rob Deans

Be more concerned with your character than your reputation. Your character is what you really are, while your reputation is merely what others think you are. ~Dale Carnegie
User avatar
Rob
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 1915
Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2006 7:49 pm
Location: Durban

Re: Black Tree Snake not a Boomslang!

Postby BOOGY » Tue Jun 16, 2009 11:58 am

Awsome snake. Have to agree that second pic looks like a Rinkhals.Exept for the eye.

Do post some more pics of this species. PLEASE!
Reptile Roulette - JUST SAY NO!
Burger Loots
User avatar
BOOGY
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 696
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2007 2:55 pm
Location: Whiteriver

Re: Black Tree Snake not a Boomslang!

Postby Contortrix » Fri Jul 31, 2009 4:44 am

Herphabitat wrote:Quintin: Are there still mines in Angola is a bit of an understatement! Every province in this country has been mined; clearance is ongoing and will be for many years to come. The UN estimated their are approximately 600 land mines per each Angolan but some believe this to be an over exaggeration. What we should remember is that during the civil war, most of all counties jumped on the band wagon and weather directly or in directly those mines found their way into Angolan soil, not to mention the trip wires, booby traps and UXOs! But you are right in saying that the South is heavily mined namely Namibe, Cunene and Cauandocubango! I have learned to go against my instinct of just running blindly into the bush chasing after a new species of snake and have had to let many escape when they went into unsafe areas; hence I still have both my legs! Oh and don't get too excited for the wacky tobaccy, if you look closely you will see it's actually Mandioca plants which the root is harvested as the staple food here called Funge. It is something like pap but much more sticky, you can lay bricks with the stuff and takes some getting used to.

Rob: I'm not to sure if the babies would be uniform black like the adults, I have seen a pic on the net which suggests other wise but their is also a SA reptiles member "Contorix" who’s pair had mated, I wonder if he was successful and got any young from that mating?

BR: Ja, a large eyed tree rinkals! From what I have read about this species the venom has been compared to that of the Boom slang!





Hello. Sadly the matings of my Thrasops pair resulted in 7+ slugs :smt009 But later this year i'm going to try and breed them again and hopefully it will result in some nice fertile eggs this time.

Cheers, Ronny
Atheist.
User avatar
Contortrix
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 152
Joined: Sat Feb 17, 2007 11:28 pm

Re: Black Tree Snake not a Boomslang!

Postby Contortrix » Fri Feb 12, 2010 4:29 pm

Good news, my Thrasopsfemale is stuffed with eggs again. This time i really hope they are fertile!
:)
Atheist.
User avatar
Contortrix
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 152
Joined: Sat Feb 17, 2007 11:28 pm

Re: Black Tree Snake not a Boomslang!

Postby Pythonodipsas » Fri Feb 12, 2010 4:34 pm

This is great news Contortrix, Im holding thumbs they are fertile and look forward to updates.
`
If you wanna find out what's behind these cold eyes, you'll just have to claw your way through this disguise.
Roger Waters & David Gilmour - 1979
User avatar
Pythonodipsas
SAReptiles Techie
 
Posts: 3164
Joined: Sun Jul 31, 2005 1:32 pm
Location: Ramsgate, KZN

Re: Black Tree Snake not a Boomslang!

Postby Warren Klein » Sun Feb 21, 2010 11:00 am

Hi Contortrix, just seen this update now. That's good news, I look forward to seeing some hatchling pics as they look so different to the adults.
An inaccurate naturalist is a pest and a danger, forever perpetuating illogical deductions and landing later naturalists in trouble. Damm and blast them all to hell in the most painful way. C.J.P. Ionides
User avatar
Warren Klein
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 932
Joined: Sun Apr 12, 2009 5:16 pm
Location: Bela Bela, South Africa / Angola

Re: Black Tree Snake not a Boomslang!

Postby slangman » Sun Feb 21, 2010 11:13 am

awsomw pics !!!! there is very little info on these guys available and i have never seen any snaps quite as clear as yours !!!
also, is it just me or is there some quality wild growing 'mountain cabbage ' in pics 5 and 6 ??
User avatar
slangman
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 478
Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2007 10:03 pm
Location: liverpool

Re: Black Tree Snake not a Boomslang!

Postby Scarletfirelion » Tue Dec 17, 2013 3:47 pm

Is this snake also called a black tree cobra or a hoodless cobra?
Scarletfirelion
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Dec 06, 2013 2:38 pm

Re: Black Tree Snake not a Boomslang!

Postby Warren Klein » Mon Dec 23, 2013 7:33 pm

In Angola were this specimen was captured all snakes are called "cobras" and it could very well be known as a black tree cobra by locals but I believe the true Black tree cobra would be Pseudohaja nigra.
An inaccurate naturalist is a pest and a danger, forever perpetuating illogical deductions and landing later naturalists in trouble. Damm and blast them all to hell in the most painful way. C.J.P. Ionides
User avatar
Warren Klein
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 932
Joined: Sun Apr 12, 2009 5:16 pm
Location: Bela Bela, South Africa / Angola

Previous

Return to Exotic highly venomous snakes

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron