Keeping Philothamnus

South African snakes commonly known as non-venomous, including the Natal rock python (Python natalensis).

View Gallery

Keeping Philothamnus

Postby BushSnake » Sun Aug 12, 2007 9:42 pm

Hi

Is anyone keeping Philothamnus sp at the moment? If so, are they difficult and what do you feed them? I am really interested in keeping Green Water Snake (P.hoplogaster) / Natal Green Snakes (P.natalensis). Has anyone bred them (i.e. where can I get legal captive bred specimens)?
We must remember that a photograph can hold just as much as we put into it, and no one has ever approached the full possibilities of the medium - Ansel Adams
User avatar
BushSnake
SA Reptiles Honorary Member
 
Posts: 1678
Joined: Tue Jul 17, 2007 5:18 pm
Location: Johannesburg... and all over SA

Postby Pythonodipsas » Sun Aug 12, 2007 10:06 pm

Hi Bushsnake, it is such a pity that no one (that I ever knew of) breeds these beautiful snakes.

Their feeding requirements keep people from keeping them for long periods. Some people have managed to get them to eat scented (gecko or frog) pink mice. Some of the bigger forms like P. angolensis will take mice naturally. But P. hoplogaster and natalaensis may prove to be difficult. If you can get an endless supply of geckos and/or frogs (not toads) then they will make rewarding captives.

If you do keep them then try set them up in a spacious cage or aquarium with full-spectrum lighting if possible. They are diurnal and love the sun.
`
If you wanna find out what's behind these cold eyes, you'll just have to claw your way through this disguise.
Roger Waters & David Gilmour - 1979
User avatar
Pythonodipsas
SAReptiles Techie
 
Posts: 3166
Joined: Sun Jul 31, 2005 1:32 pm
Location: Ramsgate, KZN

Postby mfezi » Mon Aug 13, 2007 12:03 am

here are my thoughts on them ,
if they were worth 300 dollars each in the states a lot more people would be keen to work with them. No one wants to work with an animal that can be bought and sold for 30usd each!! I think they are among the coolest african snakes there are. I am currently working with the only species that has the potential to sell for 300usd each, Philothamnus macrops

They are orange, blue and green as babies and then go to bronze, green and blue as adults. They also go onto mice quite easily. Here is a pic of one of my babies. I will take photos of my adults and post em later

Image

Image

Image

Image
User avatar
mfezi
Photo of the Month Winner
 
Posts: 345
Joined: Tue Jun 27, 2006 11:59 pm
Location: San Diego California

Postby kentbra » Mon Aug 13, 2007 8:16 am

Hello BushSnake
Me and a friend of mine is keeping and breeding Philothamnus species. So far we have come to the conclusion that Hoplogaster and natalensisAre among the easier species to keep.
P. battersbui is the easiet and that species is also easy to breed. We are on the second generation on Batterbui.
Hoplogaster we have had some problem with raising babies and we are still waiting for eggs from natalensis.
Other species we have tryed is P. punctatus, P. ornatus and P. macrops.

If you get a gruop of hoplogaster or natalensis you can feed the on fishes. We have started all our Philothamnus on Goldfish. Whjen they take live fish without problem, we try with dead. When this work we feed them scented pinkees.
Be careful when feeding them. They are aggressive feeders and we lost several male du toi female biting them.
The male is much smaller than females.
We keep our males separated from our females.
Breeeding takes place all year and 4 to 6 eggs are laid.
Babies are best feed on small fishes and frogs / tadpoles to start with.
They grow fast and will mature at their first year.

Kent
User avatar
kentbra
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 85
Joined: Mon Aug 07, 2006 9:46 am
Location: Sweden

Postby BushSnake » Mon Aug 13, 2007 8:42 am

Thanks a lot! Really interesting! I have never thought about feeding them fish (which is probably one of their natural prey)! It can easily feed them on either barbs (Barbus trimaculatus / similar) and little Tilapia (Tilapia sparmanni / Pseudocrenilabrus sp. ) Exotics like platies / swordtails / goldies can obviously also be used. Are there any freshwater fish that should rather not be used because of spines, etc? I am just a bit worried that the dorsal spine might hurt the snakes. How do you present the prey to the snakes?

What size cage would you recommend?
We must remember that a photograph can hold just as much as we put into it, and no one has ever approached the full possibilities of the medium - Ansel Adams
User avatar
BushSnake
SA Reptiles Honorary Member
 
Posts: 1678
Joined: Tue Jul 17, 2007 5:18 pm
Location: Johannesburg... and all over SA

Postby kentbra » Mon Aug 13, 2007 9:08 am

We are keeping 4 females in a cage of 100 * 60 cm and 80 cm high. Ther is a big waterdish and plenty of live plants inside.
As for fish, they tend to like big size, so auquarim fishes such as swordtail and platies are not big enough.
As for spines, there seem to be no prombel. Or Batterbui take perch and other spiny species with out any problem.
Just put the live fish in the waterbowl and make sure that it is not to deep. Keep the waterlevel just as high as the fish is tall.

God luck.

Kent
User avatar
kentbra
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 85
Joined: Mon Aug 07, 2006 9:46 am
Location: Sweden

Postby Pythonodipsas » Mon Aug 13, 2007 9:19 am

Wow, my assumptions about them being difficult are...I guess assumptions. Reading other successes is inspiring me to keep them. I also never thought of fish - DUH! Even though fish is mentioned as a natural part of their diet in most literature.

Don, those P. macrops are beautiful. Nice shots.

Kentbra do you have any pics lying around?
`
If you wanna find out what's behind these cold eyes, you'll just have to claw your way through this disguise.
Roger Waters & David Gilmour - 1979
User avatar
Pythonodipsas
SAReptiles Techie
 
Posts: 3166
Joined: Sun Jul 31, 2005 1:32 pm
Location: Ramsgate, KZN

Postby gaboon69 » Tue Aug 14, 2007 10:34 pm

Heard that they need U.V--that true?
Those who dwell among the beauties and mysteries of the earth are never alone or weary of life ~
Rachel Carson
User avatar
gaboon69
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 1674
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2007 5:51 pm
Location: Gauteng my deng

Postby SarkkaS » Wed Oct 31, 2007 10:00 pm

Has anyone else gotten experience and/or results with Philothamnus hoplogaster or punctatus?

Kent: You've got mail ;)


-Sale
Sauli Särkkä
User avatar
SarkkaS
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 239
Joined: Wed Oct 31, 2007 12:23 pm
Location: Oulunsalo, Finland, EU

Postby Clint123 » Thu Nov 01, 2007 6:58 pm

I had one about 10 years ago... from what i can remeber is that they love live fish... i used to go to harties and catch canery Kurper and belive me they loved it! Besides that cant remember much!
User avatar
Clint123
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 117
Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2007 12:42 pm
Location: Johanesburg

Postby joeysgreen » Sun Dec 09, 2007 9:55 am

Hey guys, this thread attracted me to join the forums here. I too am looking to try and keep Philothamnus. The species that first attracted me was P.carinatus. Do any of you have any experience with this animal?

Ian
joeysgreen
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2007 9:46 am
Location: Edmonton

Postby Rob » Sun Dec 09, 2007 10:12 am

GABOON - I would think that any diurnal animal would benefit from UV
Rob Deans

Be more concerned with your character than your reputation. Your character is what you really are, while your reputation is merely what others think you are. ~Dale Carnegie
User avatar
Rob
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 1915
Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2006 7:49 pm
Location: Durban

Postby Souggy » Sun Dec 09, 2007 5:58 pm

This forums attracted me because of the boomslangs, but since venomous are not legal here... Well them Philothamnus look pretty close to Green Mambas and Boomslangs. Like Ian, I am going to try and keep this species as well.

In addition to the P. carinatus, is there any information on the P. punctatus in regard to keeping and breeding them?

Dave
Souggy
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 9
Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2007 4:53 pm
Location: Pacific Northwest

Postby Bushviper » Mon Dec 10, 2007 6:07 am

Unfortunately very few people keep this genus in South Africa and most would certainly never have kept P. punctatus or P. carinatus.

What we commonly find are not really brought into captivity because of their habits of preferring geckos lizards and frogs instead of rodents.
It is easier to ask for forgiveness than permission.

Those who are afraid to ask are ashamed of learning.
User avatar
Bushviper
Founder Member
 
Posts: 17358
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2005 10:02 am
Location: Pretoria

Postby Souggy » Mon Dec 10, 2007 7:27 am

How strict of a lizard and frog-eater are they?

We have a couple of herp-eaters that convert to fish... in the North American hobby.
Souggy
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 9
Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2007 4:53 pm
Location: Pacific Northwest

Next

Return to Indigenous fangless snakes

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron