Identify please.

Identify please.

Postby MrG » Fri Jul 06, 2007 2:37 pm

Image
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Postby Bra_joe » Fri Jul 06, 2007 2:42 pm

I think it's a Rinkhals (hemachatus haemachatus) I think
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Postby Nasicornis » Fri Jul 06, 2007 2:50 pm

I would also guess rinkhals (Hemachatus haemachatus) but the pic was taken a bit far away and the body almost doesnt appear atocky enough to be a rinkhals. But the sceles "appear" to be keeled wich would make it a rinkhals in my book.
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Postby froot » Fri Jul 06, 2007 2:54 pm

Where was the pic taken Mr G?
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Postby MrG » Fri Jul 06, 2007 3:16 pm

It was taken yesterday at 11hoo in Northern Chad at a Oil rig.
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Postby MrG » Fri Jul 06, 2007 3:17 pm

It was taken yesterday at 11hoo in Northern Chad at a Oil rig.


I would guess a Black spitter ?????
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Postby Bushviper » Fri Jul 06, 2007 3:58 pm

The only cobras that occur in Chad are the red spitter and the Black necked spitter.

Seeing as it is not the red one only the black necked remains.
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Postby Nivea » Fri Jul 06, 2007 4:45 pm

Hi would go with a very bland looking Egyptian Cobra (Naja haje), Considering that the Naja haje complex runs right through North Africa, i would assume that Naja haje would enter Chad.
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Postby Bushviper » Fri Jul 06, 2007 4:55 pm

Nivea, the north African Naja haje are not known for having dark markings on the underside of the hood.

Even our closely related Snouted cobras and Cape cobras lose the dark neck markings as they get older and this either disappears or is very faded.

This however is not true for the Naja nigricollis.

Strangely I cannot find any records of Naja haje occuring in Chad.
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Postby Pythonodipsas » Fri Jul 06, 2007 6:18 pm

I think Black-Necked spitter too.

Does West African Spitting Cobra (N. katiensis) occur in Chad?
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Postby armata » Fri Jul 06, 2007 7:09 pm

I would say N.nigrocollis

but your Q about N.katiensis leaves room for doubt
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Postby Bushviper » Sat Jul 07, 2007 4:02 pm

Naja katiensis should occur in Chad although I dont think there are museum specimens listed from there.

That snake is not a reddish brown as N. katiensis would be. The WA brown spitter is also a light orange brown underneath which this one does not have. The sides should also be a lighter shade of orange.

If you look at the size of the eye you can guesstimate that the snake is well over a meter in length which is the maximum for the Brown spitter.

Either way you do not want to get tagged by this guy although I would look for antivenom that neutralises N. nigricollis if I got nailed.

I also moved this topic from Indigenous to Exotic.
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Postby WW » Thu Jul 12, 2007 10:31 pm

Definitely N. nigricollis - the rather staggered dark markings behind the main dark throat area are especially typical. N. katiensis has rather cleaner dark bands under the throat, and is reddish brown. Naja nubiae has been found in Chad, but again has a totally different throat pattern. Naja haje has also been found in Chad (recent French expeditions), but Chadian specimens look different.

When MrG said northern Chad, how far north is that? Can you give a precise locality? The real northern Chad is in the middle of the Sahara, so nigricollis would be unexpected there...

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Postby ColinF » Fri Jul 13, 2007 8:02 am

I still think it could be a Naja nubiae - Nubian spitting cobra.

http://biology.bangor.ac.uk/~bss166/Upd ... ae2003.htm
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Postby WW » Fri Jul 13, 2007 9:40 am

ColinF wrote:I still think it could be a Naja nubiae - Nubian spitting cobra.

http://biology.bangor.ac.uk/~bss166/Upd ... ae2003.htm


No, definitely not N. nubiae, a species I have some personal experience with ;)

N. nubiae has a largely light ventral side, and a light throat area followed by two cleanly demarcated dark bands, whereas the specimen pictured has a black throat followed by a zone of irregular, ragged black markings, which is typical of N. nigricollis. Also, N. nubiae as a much lighter head, especially on the sides, and looks lighter overall.

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