Puff Adder (Bitis arietans) Bite Protocol

This section will help you get first aid treatment protocols incase of an envenomation. This includes indigenous and exotic reptiles. Please do not use this forum for photo sharing, etc.

Postby Bushviper » Mon Sep 24, 2007 9:29 am

It would seem as if an EpiPen is safe for use by the layman however you need to be able to recognise the symptoms of an allergic reaction. If not you will be smacking yourself with adrenaline at a time when you are supposed to be keeping calm.

I am sure that in the correct situation it will be a life saver but realistically the chances that you will show an allergic reaction to the venom is fairly small.

Being a minority statistic makes you just as dead as if you are the norm and things go wrong.

It makes sense to know what the experience is going to entail so that any deviations can be reported and treated.
It is easier to ask for forgiveness than permission.

Those who are afraid to ask are ashamed of learning.
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Postby s'mee » Mon Sep 24, 2007 4:01 pm

rubida wrote:What’s the general consensus concerning the use of EpiPen’s by the layman?


It can certainly be life-saving - providing of course that the person receiving the injection is actually having an anaphylactic reaction at the time!
Key here is to make sure that anyone who may have to use the EpiPen (either on themselves or on somebody else) is well aware of the signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis and is able to differentiate anaphylaxis from rapid collapse following a systemic envenomation. Also important is comfort with the technique of using the EpiPen - save your expired ones and practise using them on an orange.

I would recommend that anyone who is known to have severe allergies to venoms (including, especially, bee stings) should keep one on their person at all times and that their family members all know when and how to use it. I am also in favour of several being stored in various locations throughout facilities such as reptile parks, zoos and venomous animal breeding facilities. The emergency protocols in such places should also include a protocol for acute anaphylaxis.
If ignorance is bliss, there must be a lot of happy people out there...
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Re: Puff Adder (Bitis arietans) Bite Protocol

Postby Robain » Fri May 28, 2010 8:39 am

Ok, I think best place to start is by asking:
"Who's been tagged by a puffie, how was it managed and what was the outcome?"
Also I am keen on hearing about cases where no anti-venom was used at all.
Does the suport treatment actually help? What about in rural places where Hospitals are not an option?
I also hear winter is Puff adder "bite season" maybe because they are more active later in the mornings basking etc, but can somone confirm?
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Re: Puff Adder (Bitis arietans) Bite Protocol

Postby mrVynes » Thu Apr 12, 2012 12:13 pm

:smt006 BUMP!

Is Robain's post above the ultimate thread killer or did all the experts die from intravenous envenomation?

Sorry - his questions have all probably been answered alsewhere on the site or possibly in this thread...but I was quite enjoying this topic although I just got more and more confused the further I read! These posts seem to be more a discussion between experts so I may have missed something as I need to look up every second word :-)

I am not a herpetologist and I don't own any snakes (I will soon though) but I often mission far into the bush and turn things over looking for them. When I find one I normally just keep my distance and check them out unless it's a python or when I'm sure it's harmless. I always thought that most doctors would know exactly what to do in case of snake bite...apparently not, I obviously need to start educating myself. I am far from any (decent) hospital so I'd like to hear some thoughts on Robain's questions. I know there is probably no straight answer when it comes to first aid in a snake bite situation but I'm wondering if it could be possible to draw up some sort of YES/NO flow chart (or whatever it's called) for the not so scientific explorer/bundu basher/camper.
I always keep a supply of stimulant handy in case I see a snake, which I also keep handy -W. C. Fields
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Re: Puff Adder (Bitis arietans) Bite Protocol

Postby ROBBO » Tue Jan 01, 2013 12:57 pm

So what is the concensus at the moment around all the confusion?
Bandage ?
splint ?
Dont understand paramount is keep the victim "calm" but Flexing contadicts this.
Also my question is is a Puff Adder bite lethal or is it that you will have permanent damage to the limb?
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Re: Puff Adder (Bitis arietans) Bite Protocol

Postby Bushviper » Tue Jan 01, 2013 6:15 pm

ROBBO a Puff adder is considered a lethal bite and you can die from it. If you survive there is a good chance for necrosis and other problems not limited to liver and kidney function being compromised. Get to a hopsital and hope that they have antivenom and competent medical personnel.
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