Philothamnus doralis Northern Angola

Snakes exotic to South Africa commonly known as non-venomous.

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Philothamnus doralis Northern Angola

Postby Warren Klein » Sun Feb 24, 2013 11:15 am

I took these pictures yesterday while doing a specimen release. I always want to photograph these Bush snakes because they are so beautiful with their orange heads, blue spots and bronze tail. Only problem is that they are so fast and agile and don't easily sit still to pose for you. It's between these, the Jameson’s mamba and the rare monocled Forest cobras which are the most beautiful snakes for me here in Soyo Northern Angola. This was one of the largest female specimens which I have found with a total length of 935mm.

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Note the beautiful blue spots between overlapping scales when the snake inflates it’s body. Now you see them.
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Now you don't
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Regards
W Klein
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Re: Philothamnus doralis Northern Angola

Postby Kennyakagera » Sun Feb 24, 2013 12:45 pm

That's definitely something you don't see every day, beautiful Warren again, really amazing.

And your photos are really nice espeacially the last ones where you can see the nice dorsal stripe on their back !

Thanks for sharing

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Re: Philothamnus doralis Northern Angola

Postby brentraf » Sun Feb 24, 2013 5:44 pm

Great looking snake, the blue looks awesome!
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Re: Philothamnus doralis Northern Angola

Postby Serpent » Sun Feb 24, 2013 6:03 pm

What an epic looking snake! Great pics too bud.
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Re: Philothamnus doralis Northern Angola

Postby Bushviper » Sun Feb 24, 2013 6:21 pm

Boomslang of that size also have blue speckling. Is that just co-incidence?

Very pretty snake that I had never even heard of before. Thanks for sharing the pictures.
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Re: Philothamnus doralis Northern Angola

Postby Warren Klein » Mon Feb 25, 2013 8:01 am

Thanks everyone. These are one of the most common species we find here and I have been meaning to post pics of these before but never got round to it. Good point BV regarding the similarity of the blue speckling of a juvenile Boomslang.
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Re: Philothamnus doralis Northern Angola

Postby Mitton » Mon Feb 25, 2013 8:17 am

A really beautiful snake and again great pics.
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Re: Philothamnus doralis Northern Angola

Postby Westley Price » Mon Feb 25, 2013 8:54 am

You latest series of picture are awesome! All the animals, although not particularly rare, are not often heard of.

It's a pleasant breath of fresh air!

Thanx for sharing
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Re: Philothamnus doralis Northern Angola

Postby Warren Klein » Mon Feb 25, 2013 4:20 pm

Thanks Mitton and Westley, I will try add more pics of this species to this thread as I take them or dig up old ones.
An inaccurate naturalist is a pest and a danger, forever perpetuating illogical deductions and landing later naturalists in trouble. Damm and blast them all to hell in the most painful way. C.J.P. Ionides
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Re: Philothamnus doralis Northern Angola

Postby Robyn@TRR » Wed Feb 27, 2013 2:29 am

Neat species.
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Re: Philothamnus doralis Northern Angola

Postby Durban Keeper » Wed Feb 27, 2013 3:19 am

Not the easiest Genus to photograph, but you nailed it beautifully. What is this snakes common name? Africa never ceases to amaze me with its many lesser known gems. That snake is wickedly beautiful.
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Re: Philothamnus doralis Northern Angola

Postby Warren Klein » Wed Feb 27, 2013 8:01 am

Thank DK, I don't know their official common name. I just call them Blue spotted Bush snakes.
An inaccurate naturalist is a pest and a danger, forever perpetuating illogical deductions and landing later naturalists in trouble. Damm and blast them all to hell in the most painful way. C.J.P. Ionides
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